‘Clean eating’ Category

  1. Cozy Nuttiness Cereal

    May 6, 2017 by Heather

    Cozy

     

    Truth be told, I am a hot cereal fan.  However, oatmeal and I are just not friends.  It is way too high glycemic for me first thing in the morning with insulin resistance as a result of cortisol issues.  But I confess I am in love with this new combination.  It’s creamy, cozy, and filling but also has a nutty chewiness that is very satisfying.  Unlike oatmeal, this combination is high in protein and loaded with healthy fats as well.  An excellent choice  in particular for those seeking a lower glycemic diet (e.g. diabetes, weight loss, hypertension) but crave carbohydrates for breakfast.  Most of these ingredients are available in the bins at Whole Foods Market or Sprouts– cheap!

    • 2 Tbsp toasted buckwheat groats
    • 1 Tbsp hulled hemp seeds (aka “hemp hearts”)
    • 1 Tbsp ground flaxseed (not whole; they won’t be digested well)
    • 1 Tbsp hulled sesame seeds
    • 1 heaping tsp chia seeds
    • dash of himalayan salt
    • 1/3 cup coconut milk (“light” version, in the can.  Note, a whole can will conveniently last you a workweek for this recipe!)
    • 1/3+ cup water
    • optional (any or all of these!):  1/2 tsp vanilla or 1/4 tsp cinnamon or dash of nutmeg (If you’re lucky enough to have some on hand, a pinch of actual vanilla beans*
    • optional:  a few drops of stevia or 1 tsp honey or 1 tsp  maple syrup*

    Ideally, combine all ingredients in a small bowl the night before and stir well.  You can cover the top with a plate or lid and just leave at room temperature overnight.**  The next morning, stir the ingredients and pour into a small saucepan. Cook on high heat for ~2 min (it should be gentle bubbling).  Turn heat to low and continue cooking for 4-5 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking/burning (if necessary, add an extra Tbsp of water).  Serve hot, perhaps sprinkled with a few pumpkin seeds or a few currants or some crunchy banana chips.  Fantastic on a frosty morning!

    *A couple of friends tried this recipe and shared their faves…  One loved it with honey and the pumpkin seeds.  Another one skipped the sweeteners and added a Tbsp of dried currants. Another one topped it with frozen organic blueberries; stirred in well, they melt quickly and give off delightfully summery juices.  Still another used a few drops of stevia, cinnamon, and stirred in a heaping Tbsp of organic brown rice protein powder. And one other loved mixing in some almond butter.  Yum!!

    **  If you forget or don’t have time to soak overnight, no worries!  Simply combine and cook in the morning.  Soaking the seeds overnight will make your cereal creamier and also reduce the phytates (minerals binders) in the mix, making more nutrients available for you to absorb.

    If you try it I would love to hear from you! Let me know if you made any modifications and what those were!!


  2. New and Improved Pumpkin Pie

    November 22, 2016 by Heather

    clean

    New and Improved Pumpkin Pie
    Alternative to the traditional Thanksgiving dessert. Gluten-free, dairy free and much lower in sugar than your typical Pumpkin pie. Give it a try! It is absolutely delicious
    Write a review
    Print
    For the crust
    1. 1.5 cups almond, walnut or pecan meal
    2. ½ cup ground flaxseed
    3. 4 dates (pitted)
    4. 2 Tablespoons organic, grass-fed butter/ghee or coconut oil (soft but not melted)
    5. Pinch of sea salt
    6. 1.5 tsp cinnamon
    For the filling
    1. 4 eggs, free-range and organic
    2. 1/2 cup real maple syrup
    3. One -15 ounce can organic pumpkin puree
    4. 1 tsp real vanilla extract
    5. 1.5 tsp ground cinnamon
    6. 2 tsp ground ginger
    7. 1/2 tsp sea salt
    8. 1/4 tsp nutmeg
    9. 1 cup full-fat coconut milk, from a can (not a carton!)
    10. Optional: 20 drops of liquid stevia extract
    Instructions
    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
    2. Grind and blend first 6 ingredients in a food processor until blended.
    3. Using your hands (and lightly wet fingers) press nut mixture into a 10” pie plate, preferably glass (just makes a thicker crust on a 9” plate).
    4. Bake crust for 10 minutes (be very careful not to burn).
    5. Remove from oven and allow to cool fully.
    6. Meanwhile, put eggs, maple syrup, and stevia in food processor (or bowl with hand mixer) and blend well. Add remaining ingredients & blend just until combined, scraping bowl sides at least once.
    7. Pour into room temp crust and bake until an inserted knife in the middle comes out clean, 45-60 minutes. Allow to cool fully before eating to allow custard to set.
    Fit With Fibro http://fitwithfibro.com/

  3. Going Gluten Free!

    September 12, 2016 by Heather

    going

    Have you just found out you have a gluten allergy or sensitivity or celiac disease and you have no clue where to start?  The majority of my clients are those with auto-immune dynamics for which I recommend a gluten free diet, 100% cold-turkey, no excuses.  You see, those with an auto-immune disease have intestinal permeability (aka leaky gut), which, in most cases was one of the exacerbating causes of that dynamic.  Gluten, along with being inflammatory for most, will exacerbate intestinal permeability in those with auto-immune diseases.  How you ask?

    Gluten is implicated in intestinal permeability especially in those with auto-immune because it triggers a protein called zonulin.  Zonulin as a substance is natural in the human body. It promotes an opening up of spaces in the villi in the intestines and is triggered on purpose. Zonulin is one of the bodies heavy duty immune response activities which should be limited to cases of virulent infection.  It is the bodies strategy to create more intestinal permeability so the bodies immune soldiers can come to the scene of the infection and help to wipe it out.  When zonulin is triggered when say someone eats wheat bread, then the process becomes inappropriate. 

    Ok so your eyes might be glazing over about now, right?!  No worries!  Just know that gluten is no good for you and you should remove it!  😉 Of course, there are many other things I do with my clients to help get to the root causes of why they got the auto-immune dynamic in the first place, heal their intestinal permeability, get them feeling their best etc.  Did you know that if you don’t get to the root causes of why you got the first auto-immune disease you are 6x more likely to get a second and third auto-immune disease?! But I digress…..  The point of this blog post is to give you some ideas on how to eat gluten free.  Here goes!!!

    Gluten-free foods:

    • Potatoes
    • Buckwheat
    • Oats (*must be labeled gluten-free to avoid cross-contamination)
    • Corn/ maize (some people with gluten issues have a cross-reactivity to corn-always buy non-GMO)
    • Rice
    • Quinoa
    • Amaranth
    • Teff
    • Millet
    • Beans
    • Nuts and nut butters
    • Eggs
    • Fresh fruit
    • Fresh vegetables
    • Herbs and spices
    • Meats and fish purchased without sauce or seasonings
    • Home-made soups (avoid bouillon cubes, barley malt, and all types of pasta)
    • Juice (all-natural, 100% fruit juice)

    Foods to avoid:

    • Wheat
    • Kamut
    • Spelt
    • Rye
    • Barley
    • Oats are generally avoided because they are almost always processed in mills that process grains containing gluten
    • Modified food starch
    • Barley enzymes (found in majority of breakfast cereals), soy sauce, and distilled vinegar (malt vinegar)

    Tips for avoiding contamination:

    • Clean out cutlery drawers; they are great crumb collectors
    • Replace old wooden spoons and cutting boards
    • Wash dish rags/sponges frequently
    • Use a new toaster for gluten-free foods only or buy toaster bags (do not use a toaster that’s already been used to toast regular bread)
    • Use squirt bottles for condiments like mayonnaise, mustard, jelly, etc. to avoid contamination
    • Mark containers with “GF” on the lid of gluten-free items.
    • Clean food prep areas
    • Dedicate shelves and cabinets in your kitchen and refrigerator to “gluten-free food only”

    Recipes:

    Gluten-Free Flour Mix (All-Purpose)

    (Makes 12 cups)

    8 cups rice flour (preferably brown)
    2 2/3 cups potato starch
    1 1/3 cups tapioca flour

    Gluten-Free Flour Mix (Light)

    (Makes 12 cups)

    4 cups rice flour
    4 cups tapioca flour
    4 cups cornstarch
    4 tablespoons potato flour

    There is an awesome recipe on this site for gluten free bread that doesn’t taste like cardboard!!  Just type gluten free bread in the search bar and it should come up. 

    If you’d like help on getting to the bottom of why you are suffering, I would love to be a part of your journey.  I help those with Fibro, CFS, auto-immune, diabetes etc. get to the root causes of why they became ill and wipe them out.  If you are interested in feeling your best, set up a consult with me today!  It is your destiny to live your best self!!!

    If you have any great gluten free recipes you’d love to share feel free to post them in the comments or email them to me!

    Peace & Love,

    Heather

     


  4. Tahini Sauce

    June 26, 2016 by Heather

    Tahini

     

    Tahini Sauce
    A wonderful alternative to the typical pre-made dips full of cheap ingredients and chemicals that you might find at your July 4th gathering!
    Write a review
    Print
    Ingredients
    1. 1/2 cup tahini
    2. 1/4 cup water
    3. 3 tablespoons lemon juice - preferably fresh squeezed
    4. 2 Tbsp braggs aminos
    5. 2 Tbsp maple syrup
    6. 1-2 cloves fresh garlic, minced
    7. Himalayan salt and pepper (to your taste)
    8. pinch of cayenne (to your taste)
    Instructions
    1. In a bowl briskly whisk together the tahini and water until combined.
    2. It will look separated at first: just keep whisking!
    3. Add remaining ingredients and whisk until combined. Keeps in the fridge for up to a week. Delicious atop sautéed greens like kale or a whole grain side dish like quinoa. Also great for a dip for your July 4th parties!
    Fit With Fibro http://fitwithfibro.com/

  5. Adventures in Sauerkraut…

    December 17, 2015 by Heather

    Have you ever gone on a stint where absolutely nothing tastes good to you?  I’m not sure, but I think it’s the Lyme treatment but all I want is sauerkraut.  So I was buying it two jars at a time.  Not cheap my friends!  I joined a CSA this summer and I had cabbage coming out of my ears.  I made soup with it, roasted it, sauteed it and each time I wanted to gag.  I don’t blame the cabbage, really I don’t.  So I decided to try making my own sauerkraut.  After all, how hard could it be!?  It really wasn’t hard at all but I did learn a couple things with my first batch.  I think the amount of time you ferment it to your particular tastes is important.  My first batch tasted a bit too salty for me and I’m not quite sure why.  My second batch is still fermenting but stay tuned.  I’m going to let it ferment for longer this time and I think the head of cabbage this time was bigger, so I’m hoping the ratio of salt to cabbage is better.  I also cut the cabbage thinner for this second batch.  Please note:  I used himalayan salt.  You can use sea salt but please do not use your run of the mill iodized salt.  A good quality sea salt or himalayan salt is what you want. 

    Here are the very simple directions.  FYI…the mashing is very therapeutic.  🙂  If you make your own send me a message or comment below and let me know how it went!! 

    You’ll need:

    1 medium head of cabbage, himalayan or sea salt, medium bowl, a wooden spoon, mason jar (I used quart)

    Per one medium head of cabbage, sprinkle 1.5 tbsp salt onto cut up cabbage and let sit for 10 minutes in a medium bowl.  You will want to remove the outer wilted leaves of the cabbage, remove the core and cut the cabbage very thin and as uniform as you can get it.

    sauerkraut1

    After it sits, mash the cabbage with your hands until it starts to release its juices, about 15 minutes.  You want a nice amount of liquid at the bottom of your bowl.  This is a great exercise if you need to get some frustrations out! 🙂

    sauerkraut.jpg

     

    Once you have a good amount of juice in the bottom of the bowl, grab your mason jar and start packing the cabbage in.  You’ll want to put a few spoonfuls in and pack it down, repeat etc. so there are no air bubbles.  This also allows more liquid to be released.  Repeat this process until all the cabbage is in the jar and be sure to leave about 2 inches at the top so the cabbage can expand as it ferments.  If you don’t have enough liquid at the top to cover the cabbage you can make a brine.  It’s important that ALL the cabbage is covered so that you don’t get any mold.  Recipe for brine solution: Dissolve 1 tbsp salt (himalayan or sea salt) in 4 cups water.  You can keep this in the fridge if you don’t use it all.

    sauerkraut3

     

    Ok so now you have all your cabbage in the jar, covered completely.  Put the jar in a dark place away from direct sunlight and cover very loosely.  I put it on a plate with a paper towel underneath because it will expand and leak out of the jar.  I kept checking it every day to make sure there was enough liquid at the top.

    sauerkraut4

    As I mentioned before, I fermented the first jar for about a week.  That, for me, was not long enough.  But I don’t think I cut the cabbage thin enough.  Each individual’s tastes will vary so taste it after about a week and see how it tastes to you.  If it’s not to your liking then just allow it to ferment longer.  Once it is tangy enough for your taste, simply move it to the refrigerator.  I have read it keeps up to 6 months in the fridge.  I know it wouldn’t last that long in my house!

    Enjoy!!